American Academy of Veterinary Acupuncture admitted to AVMA House of Delegates

American Academy of Veterinary Acupuncture admitted to AVMA House of Delegates

900-member association represents growing practice area, officials say.
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Jan 17, 2014
By dvm360.com staff

Acknowledging veterinary acupuncture as a young but fast-growing area in veterinary medicine, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) admitted the American Academy of Veterinary Acupuncture (AAVA) into the AVMA House of Delegates at its Jan. 11 meeting.

“I am pleased to welcome the AAVA and its members into the AVMA House of Delegates,” says Clark K. Fobian, DVM, president of the AVMA. “Admitting the AAVA into the house will foster greater communication between this organization’s membership and the rest of the veterinary community.”

Ken Ninomiya, DVM, CVA (IVAS), president of the AAVA, believes his organization adds a wide spectrum of practitioners’ views. Its mission statement is, “To improve animal health care by the advancement of veterinary acupuncture, traditional Chinese veterinary medicine and traditional Asian medicine through education, research and leadership.”

“The AAVA represents a growing practice area among veterinarians and represents a general population of practitioners that cross state lines and species and practice types,” Ninomiya says. “We are comprised of educators, AVMA-recognized specialties, and small animal, equine, farm animal, avian and pocket pet practitioners.”

The more-than-900-member AAVA will join the 70 state, territorial and allied veterinary medical groups that make jp the AVMA House of Delegates as a constituent allied veterinary organization. The body’s delegates and alternative delegates set association policies that affect the practice of veterinary medicine.