Exotic-animal medicine | dvm360 magazine

Exotic-animal medicine

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jun 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff
A way to make sure your stethoscope stays out of the way during anesthetic monitoring.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 16, 2012
By dvm360.com staff
These photos show how a team of 10 veterinarians successfully completed an experimental skull surgery on a green sea turtle.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 03, 2012
What's behind the tearing and irritation in this rat's eye?
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Feline coronaviruses are large enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses. They can be classified into two subtypes, of which Type I is the most prevalent. Type II originated from recombination of Type I FCoV and canine coronavirus and has been used in development of the FIP vaccine.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Decontamination of patients with ingested toxins is achieved by emesis induction or gastric lavage, followed by administration of charcoal (adsorbs toxins enabling their excretion from the GI tract). Cathartics may be added to activated charcoal to hasten elimination.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
There are many therapeutic options open to veterinarians when treating patients. Unfortunately, as case numbers increase treatment options are narrowed due to different reasons.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
It is a clinical challenge when veterinarians have to administer therapeutic procedures to pet avian patients. The thoughtful use of therapeutic procedures on a debilitated patient is often correlated to the success or failure of treating a patient.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Treating dermal injuries, fracture stabilization, stabilization of fracture sites after internal orthopedic repair, joint injuries and prevention of self trauma are common reasons bandages are used on avian patients.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The first condition a veterinarian must consider when a case presents for abnormal feather loss is whether the feather loss is normal.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
When developing a fluid therapy protocol it is incumbent upon the veterinarian to understand what the best products to use are and why in order to achieve the best physiologic response. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of scientifically based information regarding the underlying assessment parameters for fluid therapy protocol in individual avian species.