Exotic-animal medicine | dvm360 magazine

Exotic-animal medicine

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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Providing veterinary care to exotic pets is challenging and rewarding, offering the veterinary technician the chance to work with a wide variety of species. There is an inherent challenge for those working with these pets given the large variety of species presented for care.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Soft tissue surgery is commonly performed on small exotic mammals for preventative health, control of reproduction, and to manage conditions warranting surgical intervention. The principles of surgery for dogs and cats also apply to cases involving exotic pets.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Rabbits and rodents belong to the orders Lagomorpha and Rodentia respectively. Rodents are further divided into the suborders Myomorpha (rats, mice, gerbils, and hamsters), Caviomorpha (guinea pigs and chinchillas), and Sciuromopha (squirrels, chipmunks, and prairie dogs).
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Psittacine breeding has developed to fill the large demand for pet parrots created by the ban on importation. Many breeding pairs of birds are maintained in aviaries specifically to produce chicks for sale as pets.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
More and more people in today’s society are choosing to own exotic pets in addition to or in lieu of the traditional dogs and cats commonly seen in private veterinary practice. Their small size and housing, ease of care, and human-animal bond potential make them the ideal pets.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Emergency critical care and subsequent nursing care can mean the difference between life and death for a beloved pet. Critical care is an integral part of emergency management of disease in zoological species. A high mortality rate is inherent in exotic animal emergency medicine.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Respiratory disease in small exotic mammals is caused by a variety of etiologies but infectious causes predominate. Both upper and lower airway disease is seen and in rabbits and rodents, animals that are obligate nasal-breathers, upper respiratory disease can be as problematic as lower airway disease.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 01, 2011
Dr. Juliet Gionfriddo helps find the cause of Lucky Duck's eye matter.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Aug 10, 2011
What ocular abnormality is present in this leopard gecko?
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
First, birds hide signs of illness until late in the disease process. This makes the likelihood of disease progression to a serious or critical state prior to presentation high.