Medicine | dvm360 magazine

Medicine

source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 08, 2017
Much less of an occasional blip and more of a perpetual ping, the tick invasion is already in your area. Help your clients batten down the hatches and protect their pets.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 08, 2017
Veterinary medicine in the real world rarely follows what you’ve studied in your textbooks—often because of two human variables: yourself and your clients.
source-image
DVM360 MAGAZINE: Dec 07, 2017
Collaborative partnerships between equine veterinarians and farriers support healthier hooves and horses.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 06, 2017
By dvm360.com staff
Dr. Andy Rollo examines his own debut into veterinary practice to pinpoint areas he wished he’d known more about before diving in.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 06, 2017
An oral exam should always be a part of your routine physical exam during puppy and kitten visits. Be on the alert for these specific dental problems in your youngest veterinary patients.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 04, 2017
When working with owners of very ill pets, your greatest value may not be in the medical arena. Supporting caregivers through education, communication and these other real-world tips can make this trying time easier for owners, your staff and, of course, the pet.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 04, 2017
Its results seem intuitive, but this study sought to scientifically measure the toll that caring for a pet with a chronic or terminal illness takes on an owner. What researchers found could alter the way your veterinary team interacts with clients in such cases.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 30, 2017
Emergency, critical and trauma patients benefit greatly from these pain medications, says criticalist Dr. Garret Pachtinger.
source-image
DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 30, 2017
In veterinary medicine, the goal of orthodontic correction isn’t a pretty smile but pain-free, functional occlusion.
source-image
VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 29, 2017
Some cats don’t respond to catnip, but this study suggests there are other options for veterinary clients to try.