Equine proceedings papers from CVC | dvm360 magazine

Equine proceedings papers from CVC

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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Veterinary hospitals, by their very nature, create a high risk environment for the transmission of infections agents – bringing together animals from many different farms with varying levels of compromise.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Lameness is a clinical sign. Detecting lameness and evaluating its amplitude is important to equine veterinary practice.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Mar 31, 2015
Lameness in horses is most effectively understood by studying vertical motion of the torso.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Although the foundations of medical education remain largely unchanged over time, active and continuous research provides new and potentially useful information on various avenues of clinical practice such as new medications that become available, new information on the nature of various disease processes, and new diagnostics that may help the clinician.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Often times a thorough physical examination complemented with a blood count or chemistry profile provides enough information to establish a tentative diagnosis in ill horses and consequently guide appropriate therapy.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Administration of fluids to horses with various disease processes is one of the foundations of treatment for equine practitioners.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The majority of neonatal foals are born healthy and vibrant individuals; however, when a foal becomes ill, some disease processes can be severe and life threatening.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Sepsis or septicemia in the equine neonate is a common cause of mortality in the foal.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction, PPID, also known as equine pituitary adenoma, equine Cushings, and equine pituitary hyperplasia is the most common endocrinologic problem in horses.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The neurologic examination of the foal has many similarities as that of the adult horse but there are some important differences.