Equine proceedings papers from CVC | dvm360 magazine

Equine proceedings papers from CVC

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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is the term used to describe a characteristic collection of clinical signs and clinicopathologic changes in horses.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The once stodgy world of veterinary parasitology is undergoing a revolution.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Calcium is a macronutrient that is essential for many cellular processes.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The first and most important thing is to recognize the horse with a respiratory emergency.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Lawsonia intracellularis is the causative agent of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE).
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The official definition of an adverse drug reaction is “any response to a drug which is noxious and unintended and which occurs at doses of an appropriately given drug used for the prophylaxis, diagnosis, or therapy, excluding therapeutic failures and occurring within a reasonable time frame of administration of the drug.”
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs, particularly phenylbutazone and flunixin meglumine, have been the primary analgesics used in equine medicine for decades.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Prevention of EMS centers on maintaining normal weight in horses, particularly those that are high risk breeds.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The term endocrinologic laminitis was coined by Dr. Phil Johnson and colleagues in 2004, and is meant to describe laminitis that arises from hormonal abnormalities – primarily insulin resistance – rather than inflammatory or mechanical causes.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Geriatric horses are the fastest growing segment of the equine population, and represent an increasing percentage of all equine patients seen by veterinarians and referred to specialty hospitals.