Equine proceedings papers from CVC | dvm360 magazine

Equine proceedings papers from CVC

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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Thyroid hormones are important for growth, maturation of organ systems, and regulation of metabolism.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
The pituitary gland plays an important role in many bodily functions.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a term used to describe horses that manifest a cluster of problems, including obesity, regional adiposity, insulin resistance, and susceptibility to laminitis.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Bacterial endocarditis is fairly uncommon in horses and is primarily thought to be secondary to bacteremia or thrombophlebitis.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Ultrasound is an extremely useful tool to aid in diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of diseases in equine medicine.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Primary cardiovascular disease is relatively uncommon in horses.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Most valvular diseases of horses are regurgitant, rather than stenotic.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a common neurological disease of horses in the Americas. Horses with EPM most commonly have abnormalities of gait but also may present with signs of brain disease.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Veterinarians are often asked to induce parturition or they may recommend induction based on the mare's foaling history or the presence of medical conditions that threaten her health and well being. The need to induce a mare, and the chances of foal survival should be based on objective measures.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Unlike EGUS, colonic ulcers and the condition Right Dorsal Colitis (RDC) occur less frequently, but may lead to hypoproteinemia and more severe clinical signs. In a necroscopic study of 545 horses, 44% of non-performance horses and 65% of the performance horses had colonic ulcers.