Equine proceedings papers from CVC | dvm360 magazine

Equine proceedings papers from CVC

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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Diarrhea is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in foals. Numerous noninfectious and infectious agents are responsible for enterocolitis and enteritis in the newborn foal.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Recurrent airway obstruction (also known as heaves, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, broken wind, and chronic airway reactivity) is a common respiratory disease of horses characterized by periods of reversible airway obstruction caused by neutrophil accumulation, mucus production, and bronchospasm.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Strangles is a result of bacterial infection with Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (referred to as S. equi). The disease has been in the equine population for centuries and was first reported in 1251 (Sweeney et al, 2005i). The infection is highly contagious in horse populations and can become endemic on farms with previous outbreaks of the disease.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Equine colitis can be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for both practitioners and owners alike. The presenting clinical signs can be identical regardless of the etiology.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
If the foal is less than 12 hours, it can be given 1-3 liters of high quality (sp gr > 1.090) colostrum. (Frozen colostrum should be thawed in warm water, rather than the microwave. Ideally colostrum should be < 12 months old).
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
New information cerebellar abiotrophy of Arabians, Severe Combined Immunodeficieincy (SCID) of Arabians, Lavender foal syndrome of Arabians, Lethal White Syndrome of overo Paints, Glycogen Branching Enzyme Deficiency (GBED) of Quarter Horses, hemophila and thrombobasthenia will be discussed.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Diagnosis and treatment of horses with colic have certainly improved in the last 20 years. However, horses with recurrent colic continue to be a diagnostic and often management challenge for both owners and veterinarians.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Deciding when to refer a horse with colic can be a difficult decision and involves careful evaluation of clinical and laboratory parameters, surgical considerations, probability of survival, and other considerations that include worsening of clinical condition, unresolved pain, or to obtain a second opinion.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Clostridial myositis results from rapidly progressive necrosis of muscle from infection with clostridial organisms, often with fatal consequences. The majority of equine cases are secondary to intramuscular injections or as a result of direct contamination of deep wounds with bacterial growth in an anaerobic environment.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
The term "wobbler" or "wobbler syndrome" describes a group of developmental anomalies and degenerative conditions involving the cervical vertebrae of ataxic horses (Hahn et al. 1999; Mayhew 2009). Several more or less descriptive abbreviations are used in wobbler terminology.