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Breaking news

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 27, 2002
By dvm360.com staff

Nervousness and emotional stress can drive a cat to go bald, although it's rather uncommon, reports the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 27, 2002
By dvm360.com staff

Lexington-

Veterinarians and breeders would rather err on the side of caution as the foaling season nears in Kentucky, after 20 percent of mares in the region lost their foals last year.

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
Eight veterinary students were selected to receive $2,500 scholarships from the American Association of Equine Practitioners and the American Livestock Insurance Co.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
Horses with recurrent airway obstruction may no longer have to suffer following Food and Drug Administration approval of a specially designed equine inhaler with medication.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
A group of veterinary consultants and advisors have formed the Association of Veterinary Practice Management Consultants and Advisors (AVPMCA).
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
A physicians' group is suing the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for allegedly concealing information about a controversial veterinary experiment on cats to study effects of methamphetamine drug abuse in people.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
A U.S.-based organization arranged for the seizure of a shipment of about 10,000 critically endangered aquatic turtles en route to China destined for food consumption in mid-December.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
Evidence that embryos sampled from cattle infected with mad cow disease neither develop nor spread the illness to healthy animals will be released in an upcoming study, reports Reuters.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
The West Coast appears to be the next victim of the West Nile.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
The bacteria to blame for nocardioform placentitis, a reproductive disease of thoroughbred racehorses that leads to weakened or stillborn foals, can no longer hide, according to new research.