AAHA updates canine vaccine guidelines - DVM
  • SEARCH:
News Center
DVM Featuring Information from:

ADVERTISEMENT

AAHA updates canine vaccine guidelines
Association reviews core and non-core vaccinations, offers more information on adverse events


DVM360 MAGAZINE

LAKEWOOD, COLO. — The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) revised its canine vaccinations guidelines.

The 2011 AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines were created in response to the introduction of new canine vaccines and the withdrawal of others. The association also updated its recommendations for core versus non-core vaccines and revised its guidelines for vaccinating shelter dogs, the association reports.

The revised guidelines were developed by experts in immunology, infectious diseases, internal medicine, law and clinical practice. The new guidelines also include a "frequently asked questions" section to address common questions from practitioners. The answers are based on scientific studies and journal publications, but also on unpublished studies, current knowledge of immunology and the experiences of experts in the field.

Recommended core vaccinations in the updated guidelines include:
  • CDV or rCDV with puppies receiving an initial vaccination every three to four weeks between the ages of 6 and 16 weeks. The final dose should be administered at 14 to 16 weeks of age to reduce maternal antibody interference. One dose is considered protective and acceptable with revaccination after three years. Dogs (puppies) who received an initial dose should be given a booster after one year.
  • CPV2 with puppies receiving an initial vaccination every three to four weeks between the ages of 6 and 16 weeks. The final dose should be administered at 14 to 16 weeks of age to reduce maternal antibody interference. One dose is considered protective and acceptable, with revaccination after three years. Dogs (puppies) who received an initial dose should be given a booster after one year.
  • CAV-2 with puppies receiving an initial vaccination every three to four weeks between the ages of 6 and 16 weeks. The final dose should be administered at 14 to 16 weeks of age to reduce maternal antibody interference. One dose is considered protective and acceptable, with revaccination after three years. Dogs (puppies) who received an initial dose should be given a booster after one year.
  • For the initial rabies vaccination in dogs less than 16 weeks of age, the vaccine should be administered in a single dose no earlier than 12 weeks of age or as required by state, provincial and/or local laws. Revaccination is recommended annually with a one-year vaccine or as state and local laws apply.
  • The initial vaccination with a three-year vaccine in a single dose is recommended for dogs no earlier than 12 weeks of age or based on state, provincial and/or local laws. Revaccination of a three-year vaccine is recommended with a single dose within one year after administration of the initial dose, regardless of the animal's age at the time the initial dose was administered. Subsequently, revaccination with a three-year rabies vaccine should be administered every three years thereafter, unless state, provincial, and/or local requirements stipulate otherwise, the guidelines state.

Non-core vaccinations include MV, CPiV, Bb, canine influenza vaccine, Borrelia burgdorferi, Leptospira interrogans (4-way killed whole-cell or subunit bacterin).

Leptospira interrogans (two-way killed bacterin) and canine coronavirus (CcoV) are not recommended. Canine oral melanoma is only indicated for use in dogs with malignant melanoma.

The new guidelines include updated recommendations on serologic testing, expanded information on adverse events and a review of legal implications associated with administered vaccinations in a clinical practice.

The revised guidelines can be found at http://aahanet.org/library/caninevaccine.aspx.

ADVERTISEMENT

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE,
Click here