Virginia veterinary board revises rules for drug destruction procedures - DVM
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Virginia veterinary board revises rules for drug destruction procedures

DVM360 MAGAZINE

Richmond, Va. — The Virginia Board of Veterinary Medicine finalized new drug destruction procedures for veterinarians. The new regulations took effect Dec. 22.

The amended procedures will bring the state into compliance with current U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) policies and rules regarding drug destruction.

The amendments delete the requirement that Schedule II through V drugs be destroyed by following the instructions contained in the drug destruction packet available from the veterinary medical board office, which provides the latest DEA-approved drug destruction guidelines. The amendments specify that the drugs can be destroyed by: (i) transferring the drugs to another entity authorized to possess or provide for proper disposal of such drugs; or (ii) destroying the drugs by burning in an incinerator that is in compliance with applicable local, state and federal laws and regulations. Regulations further provide that if Schedule II through V drugs are to be destroyed, a DEA drug destruction form shall be fully completed and used as the record of all drugs to be destroyed. A copy of the destruction form shall be retained at the veterinarian practice site with other inventory records.

The veterinary board says the new regulation better protects the public through the destruction of unused and expired prescription drugs in a timely manner.

Additionally, the board updated its rules on drug storage and dispensing, requiring that all repackaged tablets and capsules dispensed for companion animals be in approved safety closure containers.

All Schedule II through V drugs must be kept locked at all times, with access by the veterinarian or veterinary technician only. Whenever a veterinarian discovers a theft or any unusual loss of Schedule II, III, IV or V drugs, it must be immediately reported to the Board of Veterinary Medicine and to the DEA.

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Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE,
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