Complexity of colic magnifies challenge of isolating its cause - DVM
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Complexity of colic magnifies challenge of isolating its cause


DVM360 MAGAZINE


Maybe there is an answer somewhere in modifying the practices associated with colic risk – practices that essentially have changed the horse's environment from its once range-pasture existence.


Photo 1: Cecocolic intussuception that is partially reduced in surgery. Photo 2: Jejunum that was entrapped in the scrotum of a stallion. Notice the devitalized jejunum after the abdomen was explored. Photo 4: A pedunculated lipoma strangulating about 1 foot of jejunum, which is devitalized. Photo 3: This shows performance of a jejunocecal anastomosis with stapling equipment after resection of devitalized ileum. Photo 4: A pedunculated lipoma strangulating about 1 foot of jejunum, which is devitalized.
That is not to suggest that people can't keep horses as they do, but maybe we can find out what is being done to drive the statistics toward increased colic incidence. "To me," Cohen explains, "the challenge is going to be how we manage the health of horses, given the ineluctable changes that will occur in the future — less grazing, less turnout, reductions in hay production with demands for land, changes in grain farming, greater density, more transport, etc. This is what we need to be thinking about if we want to be ahead of the curve."

Ed Kane has 25 years' experience as researcher and consultant in animal nutrition. He is an author and editor on nutrition, physiology and veterinary medicine with a background in horses, pets and livestock. Kane is based in Seattle.


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Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE,
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