New horse racing rules adopted in New York state - DVM
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New horse racing rules adopted in New York state
Updated regulations adopted after spike in equine fatalities at Aqueduct Winter Meet in 2011-2012.


DVM360 MAGAZINE


Recommendations

The Task Force made several recommendations in its final report:1

  • Veterinary oversight of racing at NYRA's tracks should be the function of the state regulatory body and not NYRA. The veterinarians responsible for pre-race and other examinations and all other racing related responsibilities should be employed by the state and under the supervision of an equine medical director.
  • The protocol requiring the NYRA Veterinary Department to report directly to the NYRA Racing Office is an unacceptable conflict of interest that must be changed immediately. Whether or not the state assumes responsibility for veterinary oversight, the NYRA Veterinary Department must report directly to the stewards.
  • Veterinary Department practices and procedures must be developed and documented in a standard operating procedures manual.
  • A standardized protocol for the initiation of scratches at the time of the pre-race examination must be developed, documented and implemented.
  • A standardized protocol for the initiation of gate or post-parade scratch recommendations must be developed, documented and implemented.
  • A standardized protocol for the assignment of horses to the veterinarian's list must be developed, documented and implemented.
  • The use of a resource list should be abandoned.
  • Protocols for the management and review of horses sustaining non-fatal conditions during a race must be developed, documented and implemented.
  • Protocols for the management of horses sustaining fatal conditions during a race must be developed, documented and implemented.
  • In the event of an increased occurrence of musculoskeletal injuries during a race meeting, the veterinary department should meet to review existing practices, develop strategies to reduce or mitigate injury occurrence, and enhance identification of horses for which intervention is warranted.
  • The veterinary department also should develop and implement strategies intended to identify "horses of interest" that warrant increased scrutiny.
  • Veterinary department employees should undergo a structured training program and regular reviews.


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Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE,
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