Equine medicine | dvm360 magazine

Equine medicine

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 15, 2015
A variety of new products are in development to halt the morbidity and mortality associated with cancer, arthritis and much more.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2015
Fluid analysis can provide important insights into how to manage colic and other troubling equine cases.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2015
Early diagnosis and veterinary treatment are key to saving the sight of equine patients with IMMK.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 18, 2015
These grafts involve relocating the skin from a donor site to cover a wound and restore function and cosmesis in your veterinary equine patients.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 15, 2015
New veterinary treatment options for this common cause of equine lameness are encouraging, but early results raise questions that need answering.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
In this presentation an overview of pathological self-injurious behavior (ESMS) is being discussed.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Veterinarians must take appropriate precautions to mitigate the risk of infectious disease in patients and hospital personnel.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Veterinary hospitals, by their very nature, create a high risk environment for the transmission of infections agents – bringing together animals from many different farms with varying levels of compromise. Outbreaks of healthcare-associated infections commonly occur in veterinary hospitals with 82% of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary teaching hospitals (VTHs) reporting such events within the previous 5 years [1].
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Diagnostic testing is an integral part of the practice of veterinary medicine – but are all test results equal?
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
In the era of evidence-based medicine – or the “…conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients” [1] – it is critical that practitioners have a strong epidemiological foundation upon which clinical experience and best available external evidence can be integrated.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Disease epidemics can progress slowly, affecting only a few animals, or they can progress very rapidly affecting many animals in a wide geographic region, as was seen in the equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) outbreak in 2011 in the western U.S. and Canada.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Evaluation of horse under saddle is performed routinely by some veterinarians and almost not at all by others.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Epidemics of healthcare-associated infections in veterinary teaching hospitals are commonly attributed to Salmonella enterica [1].
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Salmonella enterica is commonly associated with epidemic disease in veterinary hospitals and on-farm environmental contamination [1; 2].
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Veterinarians evaluate the horse at the lunge and perform flexion tests during lameness and pre-purchase evaluations.