Equine medicine | dvm360 magazine

Equine medicine

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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Diagnostic testing is an integral part of the practice of veterinary medicine – but are all test results equal?
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
In the era of evidence-based medicine – or the “…conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients” [1] – it is critical that practitioners have a strong epidemiological foundation upon which clinical experience and best available external evidence can be integrated.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Disease epidemics can progress slowly, affecting only a few animals, or they can progress very rapidly affecting many animals in a wide geographic region, as was seen in the equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) outbreak in 2011 in the western U.S. and Canada.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Evaluation of horse under saddle is performed routinely by some veterinarians and almost not at all by others.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Epidemics of healthcare-associated infections in veterinary teaching hospitals are commonly attributed to Salmonella enterica [1].
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Salmonella enterica is commonly associated with epidemic disease in veterinary hospitals and on-farm environmental contamination [1; 2].
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Veterinarians evaluate the horse at the lunge and perform flexion tests during lameness and pre-purchase evaluations.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Veterinary hospitals, by their very nature, create a high risk environment for the transmission of infections agents – bringing together animals from many different farms with varying levels of compromise.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2015
Lameness is a clinical sign. Detecting lameness and evaluating its amplitude is important to equine veterinary practice.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Mar 31, 2015
Lameness in horses is most effectively understood by studying vertical motion of the torso.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Mar 19, 2015
This method of delivering antimicrobials to the limbs of veterinary equine patients is easily performed in the field or in the clinic.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 20, 2015
Discover which potential risk factors are the most likely culprits in your equine veterinary patients—and how to manage them.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 18, 2015
By dvm360.com staff
Technique developed by Dr. John Madigan simulates birthing trigger that cues change in neurosteroids.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2015
An overview of how this debilitating equine condition affects the foot.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2015
In addition to promising treatment options, veterinary equine researchers are working to identify horses at risk for laminitis before the debilitating disease sets in.