N.J. lawmakers want veterinarians to disclose overnight care procedures with clients

N.J. lawmakers want veterinarians to disclose overnight care procedures with clients

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Jul 28, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
Trenton, N.J. -- New state legislation calls on veterinarians to better disclose their boarding policies to clients.

Dubbed Betsy’s Law, the legislation was introduced as a result of a court battle between an owner of a Rottweiler, named Betsy, and a veterinary practice. The dog died in 2007 during an overnight stay in a veterinary clinic following minor eye surgery. The animal died from strangulation after its Elizabethan collar got caught on a cage latch. The dog’s owner alleges the Rottweiler was left overnight without supervision.

While the lawsuit was slated for trial last month, the proposed legislation would require veterinarians and animal hospitals to provide pet owners written notice if their animal will not be supervised during a 24-hour period.

While the New Jersey Veterinary Medical Association recommends veterinarians inform clients if pets will be left unsupervised overnight, certain language in the bill is keeping the association from supporting the legislation.

The Nevada Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners instituted a similar rule April 21, requiring that pet owners be notified in writing if their animal will be left unattended in a veterinary facility after hours.