References: Your complete guide to reducing fear in veterinary patients

References: Your complete guide to reducing fear in veterinary patients

Dr. Karen Overall provides a step-by-step plan to help you take a more humane approach to companion animal care in your veterinary practice.
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Jul 29, 2014

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2. Pilley JW, Reid AK. Border collie comprehends object names as verbal referents. Behav Processes 2011;86:184-195.

3. Kirchhofer KC, Zimmermann F, Kaminski J, et al. Dogs (Canis familiaris), but not chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), understand imperative pointing. PLoS One 2012;7:e30913. 

4. Pongrácz P, Molnár C, Miklósi A, et al. Human listeners are able to classify dog (Canis familiaris) barks recorded in different situations. J Comp Psychol 2005;119:136–144.

5. Mariti C, Gazzano A, Moore JL, et al. Perception of dogs’ stress by their owners. J Vet Behav: Clin Appl Res 2012;7:213-219. 

6. Dysart LM, Coe JB, Adam CL. Analysis of solicitation of client concerns in companion animal practice. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011;238:1609-1615. 

7. Döring D, Roscher A, Scheipl F, et al. Fear-related behaviour of dogs in veterinary practice. Vet J 2009;182:38-43.

8. Hernander L. Factors influencing dogs’ stress levels in the waiting room at a veterinary clinic. Student report. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Environment and Health. Ethology and Animal Welfare programme. 2008. Available at http://ex-epsilon.slu.se:8080/archive/00003006/.

9. Rodan I, Sundahl E, Carney H, et al. AAFP and ISFM feline-friendly handling guidelines. J Feline Med Surg 2011;13:364-375. 

10. Seksel K. Training your cat. Melbourne, Australia: Hyland House Publishing, 2001. 

11. Gunn-Moore DA, Cameron ME. A pilot study using synthetic feline facial pheromone for the management of feline idiopathic cystitis. J Feline Med Surg 2004;6:133–138.

12. Griffith CA, Steigerwald ES, Buffington CA. Effects of a synthetic facial pheromone on behavior of cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1154-1156.

13. Kronen PW, Ludders JW, Erb HN, et al. A synthetic fraction of feline facial pheromones calms but does not reduce struggling in cats before venous catheterization. Vet Anaesth Analg 2006;33:258–265.

14. McDevitt L. Control unleashed: Creating a focused and confident dog. South Hadley, Mass: Clean Run Productions, 2007.

15. Kuhne F, HöBler JC, Struwe R. Behavioral and cardiac responses by dogs to physical human-dog contact. J Vet Behav: Clin Appl Res 2014;9:93-97.

16. Frank D, Beauchamp G, Palestrini C. Systematic review of the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;236:1308–1316. 

17. Heinemann KM, Waldron MK, Bigley KE, et al. Long-chain (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids are more efficient than alpha-linolenic acid in improving electroretinogram responses of puppies exposed during gestation, lactation, and weaning. J Nutr 2005;135:1960-1966.

18. Freemantle E, Vandal M, Tremblay-Mercier J, et al. Omega-3 fatty acids, energy substrates, and brain function during aging. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2006;75:213-220.

19. Zicker SC, Jewell DE, Yamka RM, et al. Evaluation of cognitive learning, memory, psychomotor, immunologic, and retinal functions in healthy puppies fed foods fortified with docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil from 8 to 52 weeks of age. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2012;241:583-594.