SLIDESHOW: Deadly Okla. tornado leaves heavy damage, prompts emergency veterinary response

Tornado carved a path through the equine training facility causing mass horse casualties.
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Jun 07, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

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The remaining structures of the Orr Family Farm and Celestial Acres can be seen in this aerial photo taken on May 22, 2013. The EF5 tornado left a path of destruction through the town of Moore, Okla., leaving 24 people dead, including 10 children. Celestial Acres, an equine sports facility, suffered mass horse casualties—more than half of the estimated 100 horses on the property perished. State veterinarian Rod Hall, DVM, says approximately 200 horses were killed in the storm.



Photo courtesy of Vann and Associates, photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

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The track of the EF5 tornado that hit Moore, Okla., May 20 cut through the middle of the 106 acre plot of land that made up the Orr Family Farm and Celestial Acres. Prior to the storm, Celestial Acres included an 85 by 200 foot indoor arena, four barns with stalls, horse walkers, turnouts, paddocks and a five-eighths-mile training track.

Photo courtesy of Vann and Associates, photo by Paul Hellstern, The Oklahoman

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An 85-by-200-foot indoor arena once stood in this bare space at Celestial Acres equine sports facility near Moore, Okla. A spokesman for Orr Family Farms confirmed that all employees survived the deadly tornado that devastated Moore on May 20.

Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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Volunteers work to pick up debris May 22, 2013, two days after an EF5 tornado hit the Orr Family Farm near Moore, Okla. The main barn served as a meeting place for group events, a reception venue for weddings and other events at the farm.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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Glenn Orr, retired DVM, owner of Orr Family Farm, discusses his plans to clean up and rebuild the Orr Family Farm if possible.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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The barns and stables that made up the Celestial Farms equine sports facility near Moore, Okla., were left as debris after the May 20 tornado.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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Debris, sheet metal and structural components litter the landscape of the Orr Famly Farm, a family-friendly agri-tourism attraction.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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The train station at the Orr Family Farm sustained a large amount of damage to the roof and overhang adjacent to the farm's vintage carousel. The train station served as a boarding station to allow passengers to board the "Jupiter," third-size replica train of the United States' first trans-continental locomotive, the famous Jupiter. The building also housed a gift shop and snack area.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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The Orr Family Farm animal barn housed a variety of small "petting zoo" animals including pigs, sheep, goats, rabbits and chickens. The tornado threw one of the property's miniature trains off its tracks and damaged the roof and windows of the building. All of the animals inside this structure survived the tornado.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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The vintage carousel that once stood near the Orr Family Farm train station was lifted from its foundation by the tornado. In the background is one of the damged barns of Celestial Acres.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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Celestial Acres took a direct hit from the EF5 tornado May 20.



Photo courtesy of Orr Family Farm

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The tornado passed just a half-block from Scroggins Animal Hospital in Moore, Okla. Damage is visible on Eastern Avenue outside the clinic.



Photo courtesy of Kristi Scroggins, DVM

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Danielle Dugat, DVM, from the Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine works on a dog in the triage center set up at the Home Depot in Moore, Okla.



Photo courtesy of Rod Hall, DVM, Oklahoma state veterinarian

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A dog is reunited with his owner after the tornado. Countless animals were displaced after the storm. Microchips and social media were used to reunite owners with their pets.



Photo courtesy of Meeker Animal Hospital