Tips and strategies for buying and selling a veterinary practice - Veterinary Economics
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Buying and Selling
Source: CUSTOM VETERINARY MEDIA

The no-lo practice: Avoiding a practice worth less (Sponsored by AVPMCA)

January 1, 2008

Owners are devastated when they learn their practices are worth only a fraction of what they anticipated as they approach reitrement and contemplate a sale. But if you can understand why this occurs and identify if your practice is at risk, you can begin the process of recapturing this lost value for your practice.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

The new generation of low-value practices

November 1, 2007

Owners, make sure buyers purchase your practices at a good price.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Checklist for a buy-sell agreement

September 7, 2007

A printable PDF of the answers you need before buying into or selling a part of a veterinary practice.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Don't get knocked out by a buy-in

September 1, 2007

These tips will help you duck common legal, financial, and communication oversights and keep you off the ropes during your transition to ownership.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Got collateral?

May 1, 2007

It pays to think through your options when you're borrowing.

Sellers and buyers: You both need to prepare

August 1, 2006

Owners, you want to retire someday without worries and leave that business you built up in good hands. Associates, you want a good value for the money. These seminars help you both find the right path to a sale.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

To sell or not to sell

August 1, 2006

Maintaining a retail area requires time, effort, and most of all, space. Is the investment worthwhile?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Find the right exit

June 1, 2006

Consider these five roads out of practice, and start planning your journey now.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Your practice may be worth less than you think

May 1, 2006

Too often practitioners who thought they were on the doorstep of retirement are finding they need to work three to five years longer than they thought—or even more. The problem: When they have the practice valued, they find a gap between the retirement they envision and what they can actually afford.

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